Journal of
AIDS and HIV Research

  • Abbreviation: J. AIDS HIV Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2359
  • DOI: 10.5897/JAHR
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 283

Full Length Research Paper

Predictors of intended infant feeding options among HIV positive pregnant women in Addis Ababa: The perspective of theory of planned behavior

Bezawit Temesgen
  • Bezawit Temesgen
  • Department of Health Education and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health and Medical Sciences, Jimma University, Ethiopia.
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Zewdie Birhanu
  • Zewdie Birhanu
  • Department of Health Education and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health and Medical Sciences, Jimma University, Ethiopia.
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Tigist Astale
  • Tigist Astale
  • Department of Health Education and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health and Medical Sciences, Jimma University, Ethiopia.
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Tariku Dejene
  • Tariku Dejene
  • Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health and Medical Sciences, Jimma University, Ethiopia.
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  •  Accepted: 20 May 2013
  •  Published: 31 July 2013

Abstract

Although exclusive breast feeding during the first six months of life or replacement feeding are crucial in prevention of mother to child transmission of human immune deficiency virus (HIV), mothers intention on feeding options remain unstudied in Ethiopia. Therefore, this study was intended to assess HIV positive pregnant women’s intention towards infant feeding options. The data were collected from 196 HIV positive pregnant women who were recruited consecutively from nineteen public health institutions in Addis Ababa. The study revealed that 159 (81.12%) and 25 (12.76%) of the respondents intended to exclusive breast feed and use replacement feeding, respectively. Mixed feeding intention was very low (6.12%). Not attending formal education, increased knowledge about preventing mother to child transmission (PMTCT), favorable attitude towards exclusive breast feeding, increased control belief (perceived ability to control the difficulties) to use exclusive feeding were significantly associated with intention to use exclusive feeding (p < 0.05). Mixed feeding intention was mainly associated with low control belief to use either exclusive or replacement feeding (p < 0.05). Recommended feeding option might have the chance to be practiced by most of the respondents. However, health professionals are still required to provide tailored messages which addresses attitude and beliefs related to recommended feeding and how to control a condition that makes behavioral performance difficult.

 

Key words: Intention, infant feeding options, exclusive breast feeding, preventing mother to child transmission (PMTCT), theory of planned behavior.