Journal of
Medicinal Plants Research

  • Abbreviation: J. Med. Plants Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0875
  • DOI: 10.5897/JMPR
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 3632

Full Length Research Paper

In vitro anti-inflammatory activity of ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) rhizome, callus and callus treated with some elicitors

Ammar Mohammed Ahmed Ali
  • Ammar Mohammed Ahmed Ali
  • Department of Biology, Faculty of Education, Hajjah University, Yemen.
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Mawahib ElAmin Mohamed El-Nour
  • Mawahib ElAmin Mohamed El-Nour
  • Department of Biology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, AL Neelain University, Khartoum, Sudan.
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Owais Mohammad
  • Owais Mohammad
  • Molecular Immunology Lab1, Biotechnology Unit, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India.
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Sakina Mohamed Yagi
  • Sakina Mohamed Yagi
  • Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, University of Khartoum, Sudan.
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  •  Received: 12 March 2019
  •  Accepted: 30 April 2019
  •  Published: 25 May 2019

Abstract

This study evaluated the effect of ginger rhizome and its callus as well as callus elicited by yeast extract, glycine and salicylic acid on the production of pro-inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-6) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10 and TGF-β) cytokines in vitro. Petroleum ether (PE) and chloroform; methanol (1:1) (CM) extracts of rhizome and callus were shown to significantly (P < 0.05) suppress in a dose-dependent manner the LPS-induced production of TNF-α, IL-1 and IL-6. Both callus extracts showed significantly (P < 0.05) higher ability than the rhizome extracts. CM extract of ginger callus treated with elicitors showed significant (p < 0.05) capacity to inhibit IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α secretion at highest concentration used (100 μg/mL) when compared to control (untreated callus). Elicitors improved significantly (P < 0.05) the callus capacity to produce the IL-10 and TGF-β anti-inflammatory cytokines. HPLC analysis showed that 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol were found in both extracts of rhizome, but were not detected in the callus extracts. Furthermore, gallic acid was found only in CM extracts of rhizome (34.05 ± 0.39 μg/mg) and callus (17.88 ± 0.01 μg/mg). Yeast extract, salicylic acid and glycine elicitors enhanced significantly (p < 0.05) the production of gallic acid in callus CM extract where the highest content was obtained from callus elicited with 100 mg/L of yeast extract followed by callus elicited with 50 mg/L of salicylic acid and 200 mg/L of glycine, respectively. Therefore, ginger callus could be included in nutraceutical formulations where it could provide valuable protection against inflammatory diseases.

Key words: Anti-inflammatory, ginger, callus, elicitors.