Journal of
Philosophy and Culture

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS AND PHILOSOPHY, UNIVERSITY OF CAPE COAST
  • Abbreviation: J. Philos. Cult.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 0855-6660
  • DOI: 10.5897/JPC
  • Start Year: 2004
  • Published Articles: 41

Roman Expansionism in the third and second centuries BC: A case for imperialism and militarism

Peter K. T. Grant
  • Peter K. T. Grant
  • Department of Classics and Philosophy, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast.
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  •  Received: 01 November 2004
  •  Accepted: 30 November 2004
  •  Published: 31 December 2004

Abstract

Rome’s rise from the status of a small stage on the banks of the Tiber to that of a super power in a few years was undoubtedly a stupendous achievement; for on several occasions she had to fight for her very survival as a state among some pretty hostile neighbours. It is not surprising, therefore, that some scholars consider Rome’s prominent place in human history as divinely ordained1. However, it will be argued in the paper that Rome’s place in world history neither came about by accident nor was it divinely thrust upon her, but was the result of design on the part of the Romans, and which design could be traced to the militaristic nature of their state and the imperialistic policies of the Roman government2.