Journal of
Veterinary Medicine and Animal Health

  • Abbreviation: J. Vet. Med. Anim. Health
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2529
  • DOI: 10.5897/JVMAH
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 348

Full Length Research Paper

Seroprevalence of small ruminant brucellosis and its effect on reproduction at Tellalak District of Afar region, Ethiopia

Wedajo Muleta Tadeg
  • Wedajo Muleta Tadeg
  • Addis Ababa University Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, P. O. Box 34, Ethiopia.
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Fekadu Regassa Gudeta
  • Fekadu Regassa Gudeta
  • Addis Ababa University Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, P. O. Box 34, Ethiopia.
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Tefera Yilma Mekonen
  • Tefera Yilma Mekonen
  • Addis Ababa University Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, P. O. Box 34, Ethiopia.
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Yalew Tefera Asfaw
  • Yalew Tefera Asfaw
  • Wollo University, School of Veterinary Medicine, Dessie, P. O. Box 1145, Ethiopia.
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Alemayehu Lemma Birru*
  • Alemayehu Lemma Birru*
  • Addis Ababa University Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, P. O. Box 34, Ethiopia.
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Abadi Amare Reda
  • Abadi Amare Reda
  • Wollo University, School of Veterinary Medicine, Dessie, P. O. Box 1145, Ethiopia.
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  •  Received: 03 March 2014
  •  Accepted: 04 February 2015
  •  Published: 30 April 2015

Abstract

A cross-sectional study was conducted in Tellalak district of Afar region to determine the sero-prevalence of small ruminant brucellosis and its association with major reproductive health problems. Serum samples (272 from goats and 142 from sheep) were collected from three randomly selected peasant associations along with a questionnaire survey. Animals above six months of age with no history of previous vaccination for brucellosis were randomly selected. Modified Rose Bengal Plate Test (mRBT) was used as a screening test while Complement Fixation Test (CFT) was used to confirm reactors. Overall sero-prevalence of 13.7% was observed in both goats and sheep. The prevalence in goats was much higher (15.4%) than in sheep (10.6%). The prevalence among females with a history of retained fetal membrane was significantly higher (P<0.001) than those without. Age, sex and flock size were not associated with the sero-prevalence of brucellosis. However, the presence of pregnancy was a known risk factor in both goats and sheep. Sero-positive animals were likely to abort (OR=5.1) or give rise to a weak offspring (OR=9.4). This study showed brucellosis to be widespread in the study area with a much higher potential for further spread to other sites as well as be a public health risk.

 

Key words: Brucellosis, reproductive problem, small ruminants, Tellalak, Afar region.