Scientific Research and Essays

  • Abbreviation: Sci. Res. Essays
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1992-2248
  • DOI: 10.5897/SRE
  • Start Year: 2006
  • Published Articles: 2748

Full Length Research Paper

Comparison of oral to intranasal administration of midazolam in children for dental surgery

Maisa A. Kamar
  • Maisa A. Kamar
  • Department of Biopharmaceutics and Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Jordan, Jordan.
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Ghazi S. Aldehaya
  • Ghazi S. Aldehaya
  • King Hussein medical Center, Amman, Jordan, Jordan.
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Basel M. Makhamreh
  • Basel M. Makhamreh
  • King Hussein medical Center, Amman, Jordan, Jordan.
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Saba S. AlMadain
  • Saba S. AlMadain
  • Department of Biopharmaceutics and Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Jordan, Jordan.
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  •  Received: 20 June 2014
  •  Accepted: 26 September 2014
  •  Published: 15 October 2014

Abstract

The current study compares intranasal and oral midazolam for effect on sedation for patients requiring dental procedure. Eighty subjects between the ages of 5 and 12 years were received randomly either intranasal (0.2 mg/kg) or oral (0.5 mg/kg) midazolam. The observer assessed the children for sedation level at the following time points: Immediately before the drug was administered, and 20 and 30 min after drug administration. There were significant differences in sedation level among the both groups at the time of parental separation and at the time of induction. 39 (97.5%) and 40 (100%) of the forty patients who received oral midazolam were calm, drowsy or asleep at 20 and 30 min after drug administration, respectively. For patients who received intranasal midazolam, 32 (80%) and 33 (82.5%) of the forty patients were either calm or drowsy at 20 and 30 min after drug administration, respectively.  None of the patients from the intranasal group was rated as ‘asleep’. Oral midazolam was found to be statistically more effective in providing a better sedation level at the time of parental separation and at the time of induction than intranasal administration. Our findings indicate a tendency for oral midazolam to be more effective as a premedication in children before general anesthesia.
 
Key words: Preoperative, midazolam, sedation, anesthesia, pediatrics.