African Journal of
Biotechnology

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Biotechnol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1684-5315
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJB
  • Start Year: 2002
  • Published Articles: 12237

Full Length Research Paper

Involvement of class 1 and class 2 integrons in dissemination of tet and catA1 resistance genes of Salmonella enterica from children with diarrhea in rural Burkina Faso

René Dembélé
  • René Dembélé
  • Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Epidemiology and Surveillance of Bacteria and Viruses Transmitted by Food (LaBESTA)/Center for Research in Biological, Food and Nutritional Sciences (CRSBAN)/Graduate School of Science and Technology (EDST), University of Ouaga I, Professor Joseph KI-ZERBO, 03 BP 7021 Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso.
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Wendpoulomdé Aimé Désiré Kaboré
  • Wendpoulomdé Aimé Désiré Kaboré
  • Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Epidemiology and Surveillance of Bacteria and Viruses Transmitted by Food (LaBESTA)/Center for Research in Biological, Food and Nutritional Sciences (CRSBAN)/Graduate School of Science and Technology (EDST), University of Ouaga I, Professor Joseph KI-ZERBO, 03 BP 7021 Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso.
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Issiaka Soulama
  • Issiaka Soulama
  • National Centre for Research and Training on Malaria (NCRTM), 01 BP 2208 Ouagadougou 01, Burkina Faso.
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Ali Konaté
  • Ali Konaté
  • Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Epidemiology and Surveillance of Bacteria and Viruses Transmitted by Food (LaBESTA)/Center for Research in Biological, Food and Nutritional Sciences (CRSBAN)/Graduate School of Science and Technology (EDST), University of Ouaga I, Professor Joseph KI-ZERBO, 03 BP 7021 Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso.
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Assèta Kagambèga
  • Assèta Kagambèga
  • Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Epidemiology and Surveillance of Bacteria and Viruses Transmitted by Food (LaBESTA)/Center for Research in Biological, Food and Nutritional Sciences (CRSBAN)/Graduate School of Science and Technology (EDST), University of Ouaga I, Professor Joseph KI-ZERBO, 03 BP 7021 Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso.
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Oumar Traoré
  • Oumar Traoré
  • Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Epidemiology and Surveillance of Bacteria and Viruses Transmitted by Food (LaBESTA)/Center for Research in Biological, Food and Nutritional Sciences (CRSBAN)/Graduate School of Science and Technology (EDST), University of Ouaga I, Professor Joseph KI-ZERBO, 03 BP 7021 Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso.
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Alfred S. Traoré
  • Alfred S. Traoré
  • Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Epidemiology and Surveillance of Bacteria and Viruses Transmitted by Food (LaBESTA)/Center for Research in Biological, Food and Nutritional Sciences (CRSBAN)/Graduate School of Science and Technology (EDST), University of Ouaga I, Professor Joseph KI-ZERBO, 03 BP 7021 Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso.
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Awa Aidara-Kane
  • Awa Aidara-Kane
  • Department of Food Safety and Zoonoses, World Health Organization, WHO-AGISAR, Switzerland.
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Amy Gassama-Sow
  • Amy Gassama-Sow
  • Unit of Experimental Bacteriology, Pasteur Institute of Dakar, 36 avenue Pasteur, BP 220, Dakar, Senegal.
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Nicolas Barro
  • Nicolas Barro
  • Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Epidemiology and Surveillance of Bacteria and Viruses Transmitted by Food (LaBESTA)/Center for Research in Biological, Food and Nutritional Sciences (CRSBAN)/Graduate School of Science and Technology (EDST), University of Ouaga I, Professor Joseph KI-ZERBO, 03 BP 7021 Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso.
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  •  Received: 18 October 2019
  •  Accepted: 20 November 2019
  •  Published: 31 January 2020

Abstract

With high annual mortality rates among young children, antimicrobial resistant salmonellosis is considered a major public health concern worldwide. Antimicrobial resistant salmonellosis is a worldwide health issue, particularly in low income countries with high microbially-derived food contaminations. As a result, it is important to better understand the biological factors that may control these bacteria’s dissemination low immunity individuals such as children. Thus, a sound epidemiological surveillance and control of salmonellosis (that is, tet and catA1) requires a better understanding of the role that class 1, 2 and 3 integrons play in the spread of these antimicrobial resistant genes. A total of 275 stool samples of children suffering of diarrhea in rural Burkina Faso were collected and their Salmonella species were screened. The antimicrobial resistance determinants were investigated by Polymerase Chain Reaction, checking the presence of class 1, 2, 3 integrons, tet and catA1 resistance genes. Seven of the nine confirmed Salmonella strains (78%) were multidrug resistant while 100% were resistant to amoxicillin. Antibiotic resistance genes catA and tet were present in 11.1 and 22.2%, respectively. Integrons were detected as follows: Int1 (44.4%) and Int2 (22.2%). No class 3 integron was detected. A surveillance and control programme of antimicrobial drug resistant Salmonella species is of paramount importance for limiting spread of these pathogens among children.

 

Key words: Antibiotic resistance genes, Class 1 and 2 integrons, Salmonella, children.