African Journal of
Business Management

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Bus. Manage.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1993-8233
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJBM
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 4062

Full Length Research Paper

The impact of geographical location on inclusion of small and medium enterprises in the mining global value chain in Zambia: A case of selected small and medium enterprises (SMES) in the mining area

Peter Kanyinji
  • Peter Kanyinji
  • Department of Business, School of Business and Information Technology, Cavendish University, Villa Elizabetha, Great North, Lusaka, Zambia.
  • Google Scholar
Gelson Tembo
  • Gelson Tembo
  • Department of Agriculture Economics, School of Agriculture, University of Zambia; Great East Road Campus, Lusaka.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 19 July 2019
  •  Accepted: 17 September 2019
  •  Published: 31 October 2019

Abstract

The global value chain approach has become a useful strategy to reduce poverty in the mining area by forming linkages among various players. This approach gives an opportunity to all stakeholders to participate in any suitable activity along the value chain. Once small and medium enterprises (SMEs) enter the value chain, they supply and earn sustainable income. Unfortunately, geographical location of the mines acts as a barrier for SMEs to supply their goods and services. The geographical location comes with a challenge for both urban and rural based SMEs to access the mines due to poor roads and expensive electricity infrastructure. The main objective was to examine the impact of geographical location on inclusion of SMEs in the mining global value chain. The global value chain literature focusing on challenges that SME face to supply to the mines was reviewed to give insight on how these barriers affect SMEs participation. A random sampling was conducted among the SMEs whose age ranges from below 20 to above 40 from the mining area to determine the extent to which geographical location affects their inclusion to supply to the mines. Findings show that SMEs below the age of 30 are greatly affected to supply to the mines. In addition, rural based SMEs who are the majority had greater challenges to supply to the mines due to poor road and expensive electricity infrastructure. The female genders were also affected with the geographical factors. The study recommends that the government through Road Development Agency as well as the Ministry of Energy constantly repair the roads and improve energy sources, respectively so that SMEs can afford to access the mines services.

 

Key words: Electricity and road infrastructure barriers, small and medium enterprises, mining global value chain