African Journal of
Business Management

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Bus. Manage.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1993-8233
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJBM
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 4100

Full Length Research Paper

Enterprise zones in Sub-Saharan Africa: Evolution, rationalization, processes evaluation and outcomes

Darlington Richards
  • Darlington Richards
  • Department of Business Administration, Faculty of Business and Management, Morgan State University, USA.
  • Google Scholar
Fikremariam Boghossian
  • Fikremariam Boghossian
  • Department of Business Administration, Faculty of Business and Management, Morgan State University, USA.
  • Google Scholar
Dennis Agboh
  • Dennis Agboh
  • Department of Information Science and Systems, Faculty of Business and Management, Morgan State University, USA.
  • Google Scholar
Gladson Nwanna
  • Gladson Nwanna
  • Department of Accounting and Finance, Faculty of Business and Management, Morgan State University, USA.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 13 April 2020
  •  Accepted: 14 July 2020
  •  Published: 31 July 2020

Abstract

The history and development of Enterprise Zones, as both a deliberate government policy of integrating the economies of Sub-Saharan African into the global stream and as a trade policy instrument of re-adjustments and limited resource acquisition option, have different and varied intendments for the countries that implemented them. However, what seems evident from their current, and rather rapid proliferation, is that they soon became a preferred policy option, with significantly little evidence of improvements or changes in sub-regional market developments, employment, GDP or FDI. The objective of this paper is an attempt to answer some questions occasioned by the apparent failure of these initiatives: the reasons for the proliferate establishment; reasons or factors that explain the seeming disparate applications and outcome. This will be achieved through an evaluation of selected countries’ data and determining the success factors and failures of the Enterprise Zones’ experiment. The evaluation of data and case review indicate an inconclusive, mixed bag of outcomes that could be explained by disparate sub-regional processes’ application, national infrastructural disparities and policies’ inconsistencies. Finally, it is hoped that this exercise offers fresh insights into the dynamics of implementation, as well as identify a policy or implementation lapses, make recommendations, and possible new areas of research.
 
Key words: Enterprise zone development, processes evaluation, outcomes, markets development, Sub-Saharan Africa.