African Journal of
Microbiology Research

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Microbiol. Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0808
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJMR
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 5124

Full Length Research Paper

Rapidly growing mycobacterial infections associated with plastic surgery: An epidemiological description

Jessyca Rodrigues Braga
  • Jessyca Rodrigues Braga
  • Clinics Hospital, Federal University of Goias, Goiânia, Brazil.
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Marinésia Aparecida do Prado
  • Marinésia Aparecida do Prado
  • Faculty of Nursing, Federal University of Goias, Goiânia, Brazil.
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Heliny Carneiro Cunha das Neves
  • Heliny Carneiro Cunha das Neves
  • Faculty of Nursing, Federal University of Goias, Goiânia, Brazil.
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Anaclara Ferreira Veiga Tipple
  • Anaclara Ferreira Veiga Tipple
  • Faculty of Nursing, Federal University of Goias, Goiânia, Brazil.
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Dayane de Melo Costa
  • Dayane de Melo Costa
  • Faculty of Nursing, Federal University of Goias, Goiânia, Brazil.
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Sueli Lemes de Ávila Alves
  • Sueli Lemes de Ávila Alves
  • Health Surveillance, Goiânia Municipal Health Department, Goiânia, Brazil.
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Hélio Galdino-Júnior
  • Hélio Galdino-Júnior
  • Faculty of Nursing, Federal University of Goias, Goiânia, Brazil.
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Katiane Martins Mendonça
  • Katiane Martins Mendonça
  • Faculty of Nursing, Federal University of Goias, Goiânia, Brazil.
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Silvana de Lima Vieira dos Santos
  • Silvana de Lima Vieira dos Santos
  • Faculty of Nursing, Federal University of Goias, Goiânia, Brazil.
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  •  Received: 30 December 2020
  •  Accepted: 19 February 2021
  •  Published: 31 March 2021

Abstract

Surgical site infections (SSI) caused by rapidly growing mycobacterial (RGM) have become increasingly frequent. The aim of this study is to describe the epidemiological, clinical aspects and factors associated with RGM infections related to plastic surgery. Notifications of SSI from 86 health care facilities of the capital of a Brazilian state within nine years, approximately, were assessed. RGM, predominantly M. fortuitum (39.0%), was isolated from 66 cases of infection folowing plastic surgery, mainly mammoplasty. All the cases were woman, with an average of 32.9 years. Amikacin/clarithomycin was the prevalent therapeutic regimen, and most of the isolates showed resistance to ciprofloxacin. There was an association of infection by M. abscessus and use of surgical instruments that were not exclusive to the institution (P=0.048). Thus, these findings emphasize the importance of SSI notifications and strict monitoring of surgical instruments reprocessing. 

 

Key words: Surgical site infection, plastic surgery, non-tuberculous mycobacteria.