African Journal of
Plant Science

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Plant Sci.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0824
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJPS
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 718

Review

Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.): Processing, nutritional and functional aspects

S. Bhat
  • S. Bhat
  • Department of Food Engineering and Technology, Sant Longowal Institute of Engineering and Technology, (Deemed to be University), Longowal-148106, Distt. Sangrur (Punjab), India.
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P. Kaushal
  • P. Kaushal
  • Department of Food Engineering and Technology, Sant Longowal Institute of Engineering and Technology, (Deemed to be University), Longowal-148106, Distt. Sangrur (Punjab), India.
  • Google Scholar
M. Kaur
  • M. Kaur
  • Amity Institute of Food Technology (AIFT), Amity University Campus, Noida-201303 India.
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H. K. Sharma
  • H. K. Sharma
  • Department of Food Engineering and Technology, Sant Longowal Institute of Engineering and Technology, (Deemed to be University), Longowal-148106, Distt. Sangrur (Punjab), India.
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  •  Received: 07 October 2013
  •  Accepted: 26 November 2013
  •  Published: 31 January 2014

Abstract

Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) being an annual herb is most commonly used for seasoning purpose. Its plant seeds, leaves and roots are edible, although they have very distinct flavors and uses. The herb has a light and fresh flavor. Coriander can be used as whole plant and can be processed because of its perishable nature of leaves and to increase the palatability of ripe fruits (seeds) before using it as flavoring agent in different food preparations. Whole plant of coriander mainly fresh leaves and ripe fruits are used for culinary purposes. Coriander leaves have different taste than its seeds, with citrus overtones. Coriander plant is a rich reservoir of micronutrients and nutritional elements which leads us to focus our study on this herb. Coriander is very low in saturated fat however, contains good amount of linoleic acid which is a good source of α-tocopherol and vitamin K. Leaves of plant are rich source of vitamins while seeds are rich in polyphenols and essential oils. Coriander taste is devoted to its essential oil comprising a significant content of linoleic and furanocoumarins (coriandrine and dihydrocoriandrine). Coriander is also well known for its antioxidant, anti-diabetic, anti-mutagenic, anti-anxiety and antimicrobial activity along with analgesic and hormone balancing effect that promotes its use in foods due to numerous health benefits and its protective effect to preserve the food for longer period. The aim of present study was to highlight the processing, nutritional and functional aspects of coriander.

Key words: Coriander, processing, fatty acids, antioxidant content, anti-diabetic, anti-mutagenic, anti-anxiety, diuretic activity, metal detoxification, anti-hyperglycemic activity.