Journal of
Philosophy and Culture

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS AND PHILOSOPHY, UNIVERSITY OF CAPE COAST
  • Abbreviation: J. Philos. Cult.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 0855-6660
  • DOI: 10.5897/JPC
  • Start Year: 2004
  • Published Articles: 41

Review

Can there be an African logic?

Felix Ayemere Airoboman
  • Felix Ayemere Airoboman
  • Department of Philosophy, Faculty of Arts, University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria.
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Sylvester Idemudia Odia
  • Sylvester Idemudia Odia
  • Department of Philosophy, Faculty of Arts, University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 15 November 2018
  •  Accepted: 02 April 2019
  •  Published: 31 May 2019

Abstract

Since the myriads of questions and keen debates concerning the existence or otherwise of African philosophy have been defused and now become obsolete, some thinkers are poised to argue for contextual or African peculiar perspective of the various branches of philosophy, including logic. The preoccupation in this study is to make an inquiry into whether logic is culture bound or contextualizable, and, by extension, whether there is or there can be a logic that is peculiarly African, a logic of the Aristotelian, Boolean, Eulerian and Russellian kinds.  While some philosophers argued for contextual logic, some, more directly, argued for African logic.  They attempt to carve out a logic that is peculiarly African. This study critically assessed, moderated and mediated the arguments raised stage by stage to ensure adequate attention and response to such issues. The work agreed on the universal nature of logic and on African capacity of this order of logic. While it concluded that the energy, that is, the ability, capability and capacity for logic is a given to humans, it did not avow to culture-dependent logic or any logic that is peculiarly African. 

 

Key words: African logic, culture dependent logic, Contextual logic, Ibibio affective logic, status laden, universality of logic.